Iranian literature:

Persian literature covers the set of literary works written in Persian language throughout history, which leaves us an enormous period of time that encompasses nearly two thousand five hundred years of literary production. One of the characteristics is its ability to versify any type of genre, be it literary, scientific or philosophical.
 
 
 
 

The famous Iranian poets:


1. Ferdowsi:

He was born in Tous, Persian province of Khorasan, in 935 AD. It seems that he began to write his great epic poem Shahnameh (The Story of Kings), to which he dedicated 33 years of his life, for the Samanid rulers of Khorasan, who supported the rehabilitation of Persian and its cultural traditions after the Arab conquest of the S. VII. Then Ferdowsi was in the court of Mahmoud e Ghaznavi, where they paid little attention to him. He died around 1020, poor and bitter about the lack of real attention although convinced that his poem would finally be recognized.
 
 
 

2. Saadi:

He was born in Shiraz around the year 1200 and died in this city in 1292, where he is buried. He studied at the well-known Nezamiyeh in Baghdad where he acquired the traditional knowledge of Islam. He spent many years traveling, witnessing the Mongol genocide across the country, When he returned to Shiraz he was already an old man and, he was well received and respected by the king. His most inestimable works are the Boostaan (The Garden) and Golestaan (The garden of Roses). Saadi wrote these books in prose and verse, drew a distinguishing line between the spiritual and the mundane life. The peculiar mixture of kindness, cynicism, humor and resignation of his works, together with his tendency to escape the compromised dilemmas, make Saadi the most typical and charming writer of the Iranian culture.
 
 
 

3. Hafez Shirazi:

Hafez was born in Shiraz in 1319 AD. Regarded to his prodigious memory since childhood, he memorized the Quran through his father's recitations, which earned him the nickname of Hafez (title given to those who know and can read the Quran by heart). He also memorized the work of his hero, the poet Saadi, as well as works of Attar, Rumi and Nezami. He embodied his wisdom in the form of a mystical poetry. He fell in love with a young woman of great beauty to whom he dedicated many poems. According to his situation, his poetry went through the phase of spiritual romanticism or protest. After 40 nights of vigil and spiritual seclusion, he reached the "cosmic consciousness". Hafez has left about 500 ghazales, 42 rubais and some Ghasidehs, which he composed for fifty years. He only wrote when he felt divinely inspired.
 
 
 

4. Rumi:

Jalal-e-Din Mohammad Molavi Rumi, also known as Mawlana, was born in 1207 AD. In Balkh in the NE of Persia, nowadays Afghanistan, in a persanophonic family, died in 1273 in Qonya, in what is now Turkey, where it had been installed. His spiritual mentor was Shams-e Tabrizi. He founded the order of whirling dervishes also known as "Samaa", which has survived to this day. His best-known work is the Masnavi. So is the Divan. Rumi was the great Sufi poet and philosopher. His influence on philosophy, literature, mysticism and culture throughout Central Asia and Islamic countries has been so profound that almost all thinkers since his death until today have referred to his verses.
 
 
 

5. Khayyam:

Omar Khayyam lived between 1044 and 1123 AD and was a well-known mathematician and astronomer, poet, philosopher and doctor. Omar Khayyam reformed the solar calendar. In the western world, his quatrains became famous after Edward Fitzgerald, in 1839, published the English translation of the "Rubaiyat" (quatrains). Since then Khayyam has become one of the most popular classics in the world of literature. Its remarked that it is common practice for Iranians to visit the mausoleums of poets to read their verses and pay tribute to them; poets are considered, in addition to wise teachers, true cultural heroes and pride of the nation. It has said that Persian is the language of the thousand poets; it certainly is. We could even say that poetry has forged Persian culture. It is a factor of identity that crosses ethnic groups and social classes; Proverbs, sayings and anecdotes are derived from the texts of ancient poets. The Faith of Hafez in the existence and purity of the human soul explains its validity despite the centuries and the copious presence of followers in his tomb that hot and tense June day. In front of their sarcophagus, Iranians from all corners of the country practice a very particular form of literary tourism. Visiting and paying homage to the great poets of the past is an important part of the domestic tourism industry. The atmosphere is intoxicating: hearts inflamed with the poetry of a 700-year-old author. A literary pilgrimage in the full sense of expression, a true cult of the poet in the bowels of the Iranian theocracy. While Iran timidly opens up to the world and the country undergoes a decisive generational change, Hafez's poetry reminds its clerics much more than its fatwas, its Islamic revolution and us that this country is.
 

Iranian literature:

Persian literature covers the set of literary works written in Persian language throughout history, which leaves us an enormous period of time that encompasses nearly two thousand five hundred years of literary production.
One of the characteristics is its ability to versify any type of genre, be it literary, scientific or philosophical.

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01

The famous Iranian poets:

 

1. Ferdowsi:

He was born in Tous, Persian province of Khorasan, in 935 AD. It seems that he began to write his great epic poem Shahnameh (The Story of Kings), to which he dedicated 33 years of his life, for the Samanid rulers of Khorasan, who supported the rehabilitation of Persian and its cultural traditions after the Arab conquest of the S. VII. Then Ferdowsi was in the court of Mahmoud e Ghaznavi, where they paid little attention to him. He died around 1020, poor and bitter about the lack of real attention although convinced that his poem would finally be recognized.

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Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Saadi-Iran-Schiraz-Dichter

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Saadi-Iran-Schiraz-Grabe-Dichter

2. Saadi:

He was born in Shiraz around the year 1200 and died in this city in 1292, where he is buried. He studied at the well-known Nezamiyeh in Baghdad where he acquired the traditional knowledge of Islam. He spent many years traveling, witnessing the Mongol genocide across the country, When he returned to Shiraz he was already an old man and, he was well received and respected by the king. His most inestimable works are the Boostaan (The Garden) and Golestaan (The garden of Roses). Saadi wrote these books in prose and verse, drew a distinguishing line between the spiritual and the mundane life. The peculiar mixture of kindness, cynicism, humor and resignation of his works, together with his tendency to escape the compromised dilemmas, make Saadi the most typical and charming writer of the Iranian culture.

justify

no-repeat;center top;;

auto

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Hafez-Iran-Schiraz-Dichter

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Hafez-Grabe-Dichter

3. Hafez Shirazi:

Hafez was born in Shiraz in 1319 AD. Regarded to his prodigious memory since childhood, he memorized the Quran through his father’s recitations, which earned him the nickname of Hafez (title given to those who know and can read the Quran by heart). He also memorized the work of his hero, the poet Saadi, as well as works of Attar, Rumi and Nezami. He embodied his wisdom in the form of a mystical poetry. He fell in love with a young woman of great beauty to whom he dedicated many poems. According to his situation, his poetry went through the phase of spiritual romanticism or protest. After 40 nights of vigil and spiritual seclusion, he reached the “cosmic consciousness”. Hafez has left about 500 ghazales, 42 rubais and some Ghasidehs, which he composed for fifty years. He only wrote when he felt divinely inspired.

justify

no-repeat;center top;;

auto

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Molana-Türkei-Dichter

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Molana-Türkei-Dichter-Grabe

4. Rumi:

Jalal-e-Din Mohammad Molavi Rumi, also known as Mawlana, was born in 1207 AD. In Balkh in the NE of Persia, nowadays Afghanistan, in a persanophonic family, died in 1273 in Qonya, in what is now Turkey, where it had been installed. His spiritual mentor was Shams-e Tabrizi. He founded the order of whirling dervishes also known as “Samaa”, which has survived to this day. His best-known work is the Masnavi. So is the Divan. Rumi was the great Sufi poet and philosopher. His influence on philosophy, literature, mysticism and culture throughout Central Asia and Islamic countries has been so profound that almost all thinkers since his death until today have referred to his verses.

justify

no-repeat;center top;;

auto

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-OmarKhayyam-Iran-Schiraz-Dichter

Iranische-Literatur-Ariadokht-Reiseveranstalter-Tourismus-Industrie-2-Khayyami-Iran-neishabur-Dichter-Grabe

5. Khayyam:

Omar Khayyam lived between 1044 and 1123 AD and was a well-known mathematician and astronomer, poet, philosopher and doctor. Omar Khayyam reformed the solar calendar. In the western world, his quatrains became famous after Edward Fitzgerald, in 1839, published the English translation of the “Rubaiyat” (quatrains). Since then Khayyam has become one of the most popular classics in the world of literature.

Its remarked that it is common practice for Iranians to visit the mausoleums of poets to read their verses and pay tribute to them; poets are considered, in addition to wise teachers, true cultural heroes and pride of the nation. It has said that Persian is the language of the thousand poets; it certainly is. We could even say that poetry has forged Persian culture. It is a factor of identity that crosses ethnic groups and social classes; Proverbs, sayings and anecdotes are derived from the texts of ancient poets.
The Faith of Hafez in the existence and purity of the human soul explains its validity despite the centuries and the copious presence of followers in his tomb that hot and tense June day. In front of their sarcophagus, Iranians from all corners of the country practice a very particular form of literary tourism. Visiting and paying homage to the great poets of the past is an important part of the domestic tourism industry.
The atmosphere is intoxicating: hearts inflamed with the poetry of a 700-year-old author. A literary pilgrimage in the full sense of expression, a true cult of the poet in the bowels of the Iranian theocracy.
While Iran timidly opens up to the world and the country undergoes a decisive generational change, Hafez’s poetry reminds its clerics much more than its fatwas, its Islamic revolution and us that this country is.

justify

no-repeat;center top;;

auto

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